Life after Esperanza Spalding in Boston, May 2015: Radio Report on Sonic Watermelons and Podcast Coming Soon

espalding_boston_may15Life after Esperanza Spalding in Boston, May 16, 2015:
Radio Report on Sonic Watermelons (bsrlive.com) and Podcast Coming Soon 

by Reza Corinne Clifton

BOSTON, MA – What happens when you go to what you expect is a jazz concert, but leave having experienced what could be called a rock opera? What’s it like when you anticipate bossa nova, and instead hear hints of Prince, Betty Davis and Parliament Funkadelic?

Tune in to Sonic Watermelons this Tuesday, May 26 to hear “Venus Sings” and “Sonic Watermelons” coverage of the May 16, 2015 Esperanza Spalding concert that was held at Paradise Rock Club in Boston. The report and corresponding podcast will feature contributions from artist and regular Sonic Watermelons contributor Tamara Diaz as well as audio clips from my 2009 “Venus Sings in Spain” interview of Spalding at the annual Jazzaldia Jazz Festival in San Sebastian, Spain.

Tune in live from 7-8 PM this Tuesday during Sonic Watermelons, http://www.bsrlive.com/live-stream or keep following VenusSings.com to catch the podcast.

To warm up and read my Venus Sings in Spain coverage, click here.

Afrofuturism and Education: Full Video and Short Clips of a Digital Conversation with Cornelius Minor and Reza Rites

Afrofuturism, Education and Digital Literacy: A Conversation with Cornelius Minor and Reza Rites from Reza Clifton on Vimeo.

Afrofuturism, Education and Digital Literacy: A Conversation with Cornelius Minor and Reza Rites

by Reza C. Clifton

“The teachers who don’t obsess about the future are missing out; it’s a major part of our identities as educators.”

Cornelius Minor, “veteran teacher” and Staff Developer at Columbia University’s Teachers College Reading and Writing Project, is talking about teaching. But he is also talking about Afrofuturism.

Afrofuturism, Education and Digital Literacy: A Conversation with Cornelius Minor and Reza Rites, mini clip, 1

“Afrofuturism,” shares Ingrid LaFleur in a 2011 Ted talk, is a concept that was coined in 1994 by writer Mark Dery in an essay called “Black to the Future.” She summarizes it as “a wide range of media” that allows for “imagining possible futures through a black cultural lens.” Many people associate the movement with musicians like Sun-Ra, Parliament Funkadelic, and, more contemporarily, Janelle Monae, though writer Octavia Butler is also an important source and reference.

Minor, who I met in Providence at the Learning Community’s Teaching Institute in March, 2015, has years of experience working with middle school students in Brooklyn, New York – in a diverse neighborhood. It requires “being imaginative,” says Minor, who says he gets inspiration from comic books and video games.

Afrofuturism, Education and Digital Literacy: A Conversation with Cornelius Minor and Reza Rites, mini clip, 2

Minor and I spoke by phone earlier this month about topics like digital media, Afrofuturism, and building relationships with students. Learn more by watching/listening to the podcast of my conversation with him, in which you’ll hear more about Afrofuturism and why it’s needed in the classroom, and you’ll hear arguments supporting the necessity of including digital media in schools, expanding definitions of literacy, and why it’s necessary and difficult to introduce and pursue alternative lifestyles in the face of respectability politics and bullying on the streets and in media.

Afrofuturism, Education and Digital Literacy: A Conversation with Cornelius Minor and Reza Rites, mini clip, 3

Follow and learn more about Cornelius Minor:
On Twitter @MisterMinor
kassandcorn.com

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Hear Ingrid LaFleur Discuss Afrofuturism
youtube.com/watch?v=x7bCaSzk9Zc

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Follow Reza Rites:
venussings.com
ambitiousblackfeminist.com
FB and Twitter @rezaclif
FB, Twitter and Instagram @3amblack

REMIX! New Social Media and Blogging Workshop Starts Tomorrow, May 7, 2015 at AS220

Hi Friends,

I’m super excited to present a remixed version of my social media/blogging class starting this Thursday, May 7 at 6:30p at the As220 Media Labs in downtown Providence (entrance on Lucie Way).

What’s the difference between Facebook, Twitter and Instagram? How do I start a blog and what the heck is Tumblr? What’s the right platform for sharing my talents and skills online? What’s the trick to posting daily?

These are just some of the questions I’ll explore while participants select a platform and implement my compilation of tips and best practices for showcasing art, interests and talents online.

I look forward to seeing some new faces and I hope you’ll help me spread the word.

CLICK HERE TO SIGN UP: http://shop.as220.org/collections/workshops-media-arts/products/blogging

Sunshine and Laughter,
Reza Rites